GARMENTS FOR THE STAGE, WHETHER THEATER, CINEMA OR TELEVISION,
DIFFER FROM WHAT ONE WEARS ON THE STREET.

“Imagination, and I would dare to say, exaggeration are encouraged and developed.  They are reference points for creative outlets but they should not be confused, particularly with regard to the look.  Structure and workmanship are something else. Stage outfits represent the icons of the moment, they help depict  the state of mind of a particular personality.” The exquisite and elegant costumes of those years thus represented the society of the day. Stage clothes determined the visual impact of each play in which reality and fantasy alternated to create the final image. Consequently, one can say that the enormous impact of the costumes rendered each performance unique.

It’s sufficient to call to mind the outfit, created in collaboration with Pier Luigi Pizzi, for the John Gay play in which Romolo Valli/Oscar Wilde each entered  into the other’s character with just the opening or closing of a single button. Another example was Marcello Mastroianni’s white suit in the play Ciao Rudy. New York’s Bergdorf & Goodman  was so impressed with it that it prompted them to propose a contract to license the brand which was not possible because of my exclusive deal with Barney’s of New York. 
As when recounting the life and habits of the young men with heavily starched shirt fronts in the 19th century novels to the young Massimo Ghini on a Vespa in Roman Holiday.

PHOTO: Romolo Valli / Oscar Wilde in "Divagazioni e delizie" di Jhon Gay